the-person-who-watches-you-sleep
Yesterday, I spent 60 dollars on groceries,
took the bus home,
carried both bags with two good arms back to my studio apartment
and cooked myself dinner.
You and I may have different definitions of a good day.
This week, I paid my rent and my credit card bill,
worked 60 hours between my two jobs,
only saw the sun on my cigarette breaks
and slept like a rock.
Flossed in the morning,
locked my door,
and remembered to buy eggs.
My mother is proud of me.
It is not the kind of pride she brags about at the golf course.
She doesn’t combat topics like, ”My daughter got into Yale”
with, “Oh yeah, my daughter remembered to buy eggs”
But she is proud.
See, she remembers what came before this.
The weeks where I forgot how to use my muscles,
how I would stay as silent as a thick fog for weeks.
She thought each phone call from an unknown number was the notice of my suicide.
These were the bad days.
My life was a gift that I wanted to return.
My head was a house of leaking faucets and burnt-out lightbulbs.
Depression, is a good lover.
So attentive; has this innate way of making everything about you.
And it is easy to forget that your bedroom is not the world,
That the dark shadows your pain casts is not mood-lighting.
It is easier to stay in this abusive relationship than fix the problems it has created.
Today, I slept in until 10,
cleaned every dish I own,
fought with the bank,
took care of paperwork.
You and I might have different definitions of adulthood.
I don’t work for salary, I didn’t graduate from college,
but I don’t speak for others anymore,
and I don’t regret anything I can’t genuinely apologize for.
And my mother is proud of me.
I burned down a house of depression,
I painted over murals of greyscale,
and it was hard to rewrite my life into one I wanted to live
But today, I want to live.
I didn’t salivate over sharp knives,
or envy the boy who tossed himself off the Brooklyn bridge.
I just cleaned my bathroom,
did the laundry,
called my brother.
Told him, “it was a good day.
Kait Rokowski (A Good Day)
alice-in-pun-derland

blackcatula:

wigglytuffitout:

i feel so bad for the fedora

it started out as this great icon of feminism thanks to sarah berndhart and honestly a good hat (a good hat mind you not cheap shlock) does do wonders for making someone look dapper whether it be fedora or trilby (i slightly prefer trilbies)

and now it’s become shorthand for the very most obnoxious slime of society

i am sorry fedora. i am so sorry. humanity has failed you, you poor brave hat

image

staticwizard

crotchetybushtit:

50shadesofacceptance:

superdodirty:

it ok to not be ready

Please spread this shit like wildfire. People go on and sit through the whole experience and they’re uncomfortable because they just want to please their partner and they don’t tell them that they want to stop because they are not ready. It’s okay not to be ready. 

notice here that consent is revoked without ever saying no and consent goes so far beyond yes/no!!!!!!

benedict-cucumberbooty
chazzfox:

cijithegeek:

kyssthis16:

yeezysdisciple:

youngbertreynolds:

thempress:



Maybe put it on a canvas instead of someone’s property, and we can all be happy.

who paying for these canvases or the art programs so these kids can have that? Why should it matter if these run down buildings that never get fixed up anyway get graffiti’d? 

Therein lies the issue. Art programs, both visual and performance based, are the first programs to be cut. Canvas ain’t cheap. Neither are the supplies. Much of the graffiti that takes place IS on buildings that are run down. The gov’t didn’t place any value on these properties and yet get pissy with dudes “vandalizing” their shit. You can’t have it both ways, ya dig. 

My father was a garment contractor in LA. In the late 80s, he owned the building where he had his factory. He thought it would be a cool idea to commission local graffiti artists, usually young Black and Latino men looking to stay out of trouble, to paint murals on his buildings. After all, he runs a garment design/manufacturing company, and creative signage is great advertising.
One day, he showed up to the building and the city just painted over the murals without permission or notice.
First, the city told him he couldn’t have graffiti art on HIS building because it brought down property value. After he complained, then they said: ok you can do this, but you need a permit. After he got the permit, then the city said: ok, but you can only use these artists.  Of course, these artists were all White graphic design students from USC, and of course they charged 3x more.
There is a prejudice against this type of art, and it’s racial.  Banksy vandalizes folks buildings all the time, and folks treat him like the Messiah. He ain’t doing nothing new that Black and Brown folks haven’t done for decades.

This whole post…I just find it really interesting! And sad, too, but good thing to read.

chazzfox:

cijithegeek:

kyssthis16:

yeezysdisciple:

youngbertreynolds:

thempress:

image

Maybe put it on a canvas instead of someone’s property, and we can all be happy.

who paying for these canvases or the art programs so these kids can have that? Why should it matter if these run down buildings that never get fixed up anyway get graffiti’d? 

Therein lies the issue. Art programs, both visual and performance based, are the first programs to be cut. Canvas ain’t cheap. Neither are the supplies. Much of the graffiti that takes place IS on buildings that are run down. The gov’t didn’t place any value on these properties and yet get pissy with dudes “vandalizing” their shit. You can’t have it both ways, ya dig. 

My father was a garment contractor in LA. In the late 80s, he owned the building where he had his factory. He thought it would be a cool idea to commission local graffiti artists, usually young Black and Latino men looking to stay out of trouble, to paint murals on his buildings. After all, he runs a garment design/manufacturing company, and creative signage is great advertising.

One day, he showed up to the building and the city just painted over the murals without permission or notice.

First, the city told him he couldn’t have graffiti art on HIS building because it brought down property value. After he complained, then they said: ok you can do this, but you need a permit. After he got the permit, then the city said: ok, but you can only use these artists.  Of course, these artists were all White graphic design students from USC, and of course they charged 3x more.

There is a prejudice against this type of art, and it’s racial.  Banksy vandalizes folks buildings all the time, and folks treat him like the Messiah. He ain’t doing nothing new that Black and Brown folks haven’t done for decades.

This whole post…I just find it really interesting! And sad, too, but good thing to read.

alice-in-pun-derland

Anonymous asked:

Why is Pluto now classified as not a planet?

astronomicalwonders answered:

So when Pluto was discovered in he 1840s we didn’t know nearly as much as we do now about our solar system. For example, we didn’t know that there was another belt of objects (similar to the asteroid belt) outside of the orbit of Neptune.

image

We now know that this belt exists and we call it it Kuiper Belt. You see, this is when the problem began. We started discovering hundreds of icy bodies that were the same size as or larger than Pluto. (gif of Pluto):

image

What were we to do? should we now have a solar system with hundreds of Planets? It no longer made sense to call Pluto a planet when we found objects that were just like it (and in some cases larger than it) and did not classify them as Planets. Pluto clearly did not fit in with the planets, it fit in better with the icy bodies we had discovered.

Pluto is now classified as a Dwarf Planet, and I’m sure it is much happier there. It is no longer the smallest Planet, it is now one of the biggest Dwarf Planets.

Here is a good illustration of some of the larger objects that have been found in the Kuiper Belt sense it’s discovery:image

Thanks for the ask!

funkocide:

REASON: eris now first minister of all kuiperbelt